Historical Spaceflight

wie es eigentlich gewesen

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"No spacecraft arrives in space unless transported there by some launch vehicle. Launchers originally derived from ballistic missile designs and were therefore initially controlled exclusively by the military. By the late 1950s and early 1960s, however, both the Soviet Union and the U.S. realized that the initial ballistic missile designs that used liquid cryogenic propellants were poor choices for weapons, compared to solid and liquid storable designs. Cryogenic systems using liquid oxygen provided greater performance and thus continued to be used to put spacecraft in orbit, whereas ballistic missiles switched to storable technologies that could be launched within minutes or seconds instead of hours or days required for cryogenic systems."
Societal Impact of Spaceflight, Steven J. Dick, Roger D. Launius

"No spacecraft arrives in space unless transported there by some launch vehicle. Launchers originally derived from ballistic missile designs and were therefore initially controlled exclusively by the military. By the late 1950s and early 1960s, however, both the Soviet Union and the U.S. realized that the initial ballistic missile designs that used liquid cryogenic propellants were poor choices for weapons, compared to solid and liquid storable designs. Cryogenic systems using liquid oxygen provided greater performance and thus continued to be used to put spacecraft in orbit, whereas ballistic missiles switched to storable technologies that could be launched within minutes or seconds instead of hours or days required for cryogenic systems."

Societal Impact of Spaceflight, Steven J. Dick, Roger D. Launius

Filed under space spaceflight history NASA missile redstone redstone missile soviet union rocket

34 notes


"The Soviet space program was, of course, not simply propaganda nor speculation. It emerged from the ashes of World War II, when with Stalin’s blessing, a group of ambitious engineers began testing old German missiles from the desert near the Aral Sea. With the onset of the Cold War and the explosion of the first Soviet atomic bomb in 1949, these experiments with rockets gained a new urgency. Many considered rockets, especially long-range ballistic missiles, an ideal way to deliver deadly atomic bombs across continents. Throughout the 1950s, as missile designers made vast advances in rocket designs, it became possible to consider options that had little direct military utility - ideas such as space travel. Spurred by a small handful of visionary engineers devoted to the cause of space exploration, the Soviets diverted a strand of their military rocketry program into a single project to launch a satellite into orbit."
Challenge to Apollo: The Soviet Union and the Space Race, 1945 - 1974, Asif A. Siddiqi

"The Soviet space program was, of course, not simply propaganda nor speculation. It emerged from the ashes of World War II, when with Stalin’s blessing, a group of ambitious engineers began testing old German missiles from the desert near the Aral Sea. With the onset of the Cold War and the explosion of the first Soviet atomic bomb in 1949, these experiments with rockets gained a new urgency. Many considered rockets, especially long-range ballistic missiles, an ideal way to deliver deadly atomic bombs across continents. Throughout the 1950s, as missile designers made vast advances in rocket designs, it became possible to consider options that had little direct military utility - ideas such as space travel. Spurred by a small handful of visionary engineers devoted to the cause of space exploration, the Soviets diverted a strand of their military rocketry program into a single project to launch a satellite into orbit."

Challenge to Apollo: The Soviet Union and the Space Race, 1945 - 1974, Asif A. Siddiqi

Filed under space spaceflight history rocket soviet union stalin missile sputnik satellite 1949

6 notes

Sitting in a field just outside Kennedy Space Center is a mockup of a Space Shuttle’s cockpit. Space Shuttle Resolution! was built by Chuck Ryan and a group of students and was intended to be a full simulator to bring awareness and inspiration to kids across the country. The project was stalled when it was announced that the shuttle program was scheduled for retirement. It used to be a more completed front end section, but time and weather and people have taken their toll on the mockup. It now sits in an empty field behind a chain-linked fence, ravaged by souvenir hunters. Certainly an interesting footnote in the whole of the history of spaceflight, and the Space Shuttle program, and an eery sight to see.
http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/news/shuttlemockup.html
(Photo by me)

Sitting in a field just outside Kennedy Space Center is a mockup of a Space Shuttle’s cockpit. Space Shuttle Resolution! was built by Chuck Ryan and a group of students and was intended to be a full simulator to bring awareness and inspiration to kids across the country. The project was stalled when it was announced that the shuttle program was scheduled for retirement. It used to be a more completed front end section, but time and weather and people have taken their toll on the mockup. It now sits in an empty field behind a chain-linked fence, ravaged by souvenir hunters. Certainly an interesting footnote in the whole of the history of spaceflight, and the Space Shuttle program, and an eery sight to see.

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/news/shuttlemockup.html

(Photo by me)

Filed under kennedy space center nasa space shuttle space shuttle resolution! space

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"You know the Space Shuttle has changed the way we view the world, and its changed the way we view our universe as well. There’s a lot of emotion today but one thing’s indisputable - America is not going to stop exploring. 
Thank you Columbia, Challenger, Discovery, Endeavour, and our ship Atlantis. Thank you for protecting us, and bringing this program to such a fitting end.”
Commander Chris Ferguson, STS-135

"You know the Space Shuttle has changed the way we view the world, and its changed the way we view our universe as well. There’s a lot of emotion today but one thing’s indisputable - America is not going to stop exploring.

Thank you Columbia, Challenger, Discovery, Endeavour, and our ship Atlantis. Thank you for protecting us, and bringing this program to such a fitting end.”


Commander Chris Ferguson, STS-135

(Source: youtube.com)

Filed under space spaceflight history NASA chris ferguson space shuttle space shuttle atlantis sts-135

51 notes

"It was appropriate to give a name to this new ship of space, and of state. Fletcher, Shapely, and Low had prepared a list that included Pegasus, Hermes, Astroplane, and Skylark. Flanigan passed this list to White House staffers, who picked the name Space Clipper. A draft of Nixon’s statement used this name, which resembled Lockheed’s Star-Clipper. Nixion himself, however, decided that it would be better to refer to the vehicle in the usual fashion, as the "Space Shuttle." Earlier piloted spacecraft had carried had carried names such as Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo, but the new one would break with this practice."
~The Space Shuttle Decision, T.A. Heppenheimer

"It was appropriate to give a name to this new ship of space, and of state. Fletcher, Shapely, and Low had prepared a list that included Pegasus, Hermes, Astroplane, and Skylark. Flanigan passed this list to White House staffers, who picked the name Space Clipper. A draft of Nixon’s statement used this name, which resembled Lockheed’s Star-Clipper. Nixion himself, however, decided that it would be better to refer to the vehicle in the usual fashion, as the "Space Shuttle." Earlier piloted spacecraft had carried had carried names such as Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo, but the new one would break with this practice."

~The Space Shuttle Decision, T.A. Heppenheimer

(Source: capcomespace.net)

Filed under spaceflight space history space shuttle space shuttle columbia STS-1 the space shuttle decision VAB vehicle assembly building NASA